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 Post subject: Osprey Pack Mod (Exposure 66)
PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2007 12:23 am 
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I have an Osprey Exposure 66 that I use for overnight trips. I love the pack. It weighs 4 lb 2 oz and holds 69 liters. For a 4 lb pack it carries a lot of weight really well.
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Actually, it's light enough that it would make a good summit pack, but there's one problem. With these Osprey packs people use the straightjacket(tm) compression system to carry their boards. But when it's carrying the board, it can't compress the pack. So it carries the board great when the pack is full and doesn't need compression. But if you have a big pack and it's half-empty, the board will swing all over the place because it's not secure to the frame.

I don't know if you can make this out, but this shows how much the board (on the right) is free to swing around.
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I climbed Mt. Shasta once before and I used this pack for the summit and it was a total pain. I had to tie a strap around the frame and board to keep it from swinging around. That made it hard to get in my pack, so I didn't eat when I should have which lead to a bonking experience that sucked.

Here's another view that shows how much play there is with the board secure to the empty pack. (Ignore the purple straps, which are my mod.)
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So I called this pleasant person at Osprey and she sent me an assortment of buckles that fit the straightjacket buckles. I took the frame out of the pack, which is kind of a puzzle, but it can be done. Then I turned the pack inside out and my wife used her sowing skills to add four compression straps going from the frame to straightjacket. This voids the warranty, by the way.
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Now I can pull the four new compression straps and snug the board right up to the frame.
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This year I used the modded pack to summit Mt. Shasta again. It was much better! The board was tight on the frame and very secure on the pack. Actually, it carried the weight so comfortably that I would consider this setup for any day trip where I'd be carrying my board all day.
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photocredit: jimw

I put my avy gear and other stuff that I didn't need to access in the bottom of the pack. Then I left the top of the pack wide open and I adjusted the top pocket so it hung inside the pack. The top pocket for this pack is big enough to hold my food and everything I want easy access to. I could access it easily by opening one of the new compression straps and zipping into the top pocket. One thing that's good about this setup is that the board compresses against the stuff in the top pocket instead of against my head when everything is snug.
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Here it is, fully loaded. The GPS said to keep going up and down these gullies until we find the car. Yay!
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photocredit: dan

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2007 9:15 am 
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Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2004 4:53 pm
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Location: Kalispell, Montana
Floppy packs are a pet pieve. Nice mod anb it looks good too! Nice to have a seamtress around.

Its hard to find everything in a pack. I own an older dana bomb pack with a "beavertail" style carrier but it isn't hydration compatitable. You have reminded met to take care of that before the season gets moving.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2007 10:54 am 
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Location: California
Nice mod I reckon for overnight-floppy-pack-syndrome! :)

My answer on overnight trips is to just take a real day pack so you don't have to use an empty overnight pack. Sure its and extra 2lbs of weight but its totally worth it in my opinion.

Here's a pic of my overnight pack (42L Exposure) with my 18L daypack inside. The trick is using a daypack that is both light and very packable.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2007 12:16 pm 
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BCR - if I had your legendary packing skills, I might have gone that route. But I don't think I can day-tour out of an 18L pack, much less fit one in a 42L pack with all my gear for an overnight trip!

Besides, we were throwing a suprise bachelor party at 10,000 ft so we needed the room for other stuff. Jack Daniels, red wine, ipod + speakers, inflatable sheep, ...

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2007 12:21 pm 
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Location: California
SanFrantastico wrote:
BCR - if I had your legendary packing skills, I might have gone that route. But I don't think I can day-tour out of an 18L pack, much less fit one in a 42L pack with all my gear for an overnight trip!

Based on these pics.....it barley looks like you're carrying much of anything other than the board let alone 18L of gear. ;)
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I'd say to at least consider using a smaller daypack like the 18L. You don't have to go next level and use a small overnight pack too...you can continue to use the larger pack for all those other necessities like whisky, boom-box, and blow-up sheep. :)


ps. If you want to give any feedback on the Exposure line, feel free to do so here.
viewtopic.php?t=4053


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2007 3:42 pm 
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In the first picture, the pack is empty. I just wanted to show that you can fully eliminate the floppiness, even for an empty overnight pack. In the 2nd pic, you can't really see the bottom of the pack where all my avy gear, down jacket etc are hanging out. But even with that stuff in there the pack looks pretty empty because it's so big compared to the stuff.

My regular day pack is a 30L Arc'teryx M30. It is plenty roomy for my gear + helmet inside, so I'm sure I could go smaller. But I like having the flexibility to carry more stuff when the conditions/trip demand it and I also like being able to chuck everything in there without working too hard to organize stuff.

The M30 has a small frame and comes in at 4lbs. With the frame it doesn't fit in an overnight pack well. And since a 6-pack of Sierra Nevada (which I forgot to mention in my previous post) weighs 4.5 pounds, the choice was clear - no day pack.

But seriously, this setup worked really great for the Shasta trip because I knew I'd be doing the summit push with the board on my back. The Exposure 66 has a nice hipbelt and frame so with the board snugged up tight it was extremely comfortable to carry. If we had been camping in a location where we'd be skinning from base camp, a little pack like yours would have been a good solution, too.

My pack + gear + board + bindings comes in around 30 lbs. That's at the limit where if I have to carry it on my back a frame + good carry system really makes a difference. For skinning with just ~15 lbs on my back it's not such an issue, for me anyway.

I'll post some comments in your other Osprey thread when I get a chance...

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 Post subject: Re: Osprey Pack Mod (Exposure 66)
PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 12:58 am 
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For the benefit of Ecobrad on the occasion of his getting a sweet deal on an Exposure 66...
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I added two compression straps to each side of the pack. I got the straps from REI. The upper strap (on the right in this picture) is sewn into the seam between the yellow fabric and the black Osprey straight jacket. You turn the bag inside out, rip the seem, insert the strap, and sew it back up. Or better yet, get someone to do it for you!
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The right side of the pack already has some female connectors sewn in. I called this nice girl at osprey and she mailed me a mating pair of male connectors. The are just like the ones on the male end of the straight jacket because those are designed to mate. So on the right side, all I had to do was sew in the strap.
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I was hoping to get Osprey to send me some extra female connectors like those on the right side, so I could sew into the left side of the pack. But I couldn't get the girl to understand what the H*ll I was talking about. Instead, I bought these straps at REI that have a male and female connector, one on each end. I sewed a loop of webbing to hold the female connector in place and then I added a strap to the straight jacket, just like before.
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One thing you'll have to be able to do is remove the frame from the pack so you can turn the pack inside out to sew up the seams. It's a total pain in the ass. You remove the hip belt and unzip the zipper...
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Then look inside for this little connection between the top of the frame and the two aluminum tubes running down the back. There is a ton of tension, but if you focus your mind you will be able to pull the top piece off. Then you can pull out the aluminum tubes one by one. Be careful because at the bottom of the tubes are some little plastic pieces that the tubes fit into. You will want to work these out as you remove the tubes or you may be hosed. I left one behind and had to surgically extract it. Removing the frame is a pain in the ass, but it must be done and it is doable.
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 Post subject: Re: Osprey Pack Mod (Exposure 66)
PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 1:22 am 
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Location: California
Thanks dude. I'll definitely be having someone do that one for me.


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 Post subject: Re: Osprey Pack Mod (Exposure 66)
PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2008 10:05 am 
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Location: Seattle
Not to say SF's mod isn't sweet, which it is, but after using my Exp66 all spring/summer, I never felt like I really needed that feature. I'm sure it would have been nicer at times, but the pack always seemed to carry well. Plus, A-framing the split is super secure (and probably my preferred way to do it anyways for climbing). My :twocents:

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 Post subject: Re: Osprey Pack Mod (Exposure 66)
PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2008 11:09 am 
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Joined: Wed Nov 17, 2004 11:42 am
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That's good to know. Maybe I'll use it a couple times before I take the plunge. Especially since I'd have to pay to get it done right.

kjkrow wrote:
Not to say SF's mod isn't sweet, which it is, but after using my Exp66 all spring/summer, I never felt like I really needed that feature. I'm sure it would have been nicer at times, but the pack always seemed to carry well. Plus, A-framing the split is super secure (and probably my preferred way to do it anyways for climbing). My :twocents:


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